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Easy Italian Pan Fried Meatballs (Beef Pork Veal)

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl with basil garnish.
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Italian Pan Fried Meatballs are moist, tender and so flavorful from a ground beef, pork and veal combination, sharp Pecorino cheese, fresh herbs and just the right blend of aromatics, hand-torn bread and love! Seriously, though, this recipe is foolproof, easy to make, and creates beautiful aromas throughout your kitchen as the meatballs are quickly pan fried in a skillet on the stovetop. Read on for more!

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl with basil garnish.

Some of my best memories growing up include meatballs. Their aroma wafting through the kitchen. The sizzling sound of them frying. The light sound of them being plopped into the sauce. Sunday. Gravy. Mom. Grandmom. Macaroni.

Italian Americans are very nostalgic people and love to embrace traditions and memories. And, for many of us, these memories include meatballs lovingly made for us on Sundays by mom and grandmom. Or, meatball sandwiches with broccoli rabe packed for our brown bag school lunches.

Meatballs were so much more than a combination of ingredients back then. To many of us, they represented love, family and togetherness. No recipe was as good as OUR mom’s–in our eyes, hers was the best and always will be.

It’s been nearly twenty years since I had a mom to cook me meatballs, and I miss that every day. Today, I’d love to share this little piece of my New Jersey, Italian American childhood with you in honor of her memory and all the wonderful years that I spent with her in the kitchen. Mangia bene!

Two pans of meatballs frying in oil.

Best Meat to Use For Meatballs

Here, I use a traditional ground beef, pork and veal blend (equal amounts of each) and it creates a rich and uniquely-flavored meatball. This is the way we made meatballs growing up, for the most part, and is a very common blend for many Italian-American households.

Sometimes, the beef/pork/veal blend is referred to as a “meatloaf mix” in supermarkets and has all three meats already combined in equal portions. All Italian butchers or specialty markets should carry this blend. But, if you’re unable to find it, just buy all these meats separately and then combine them yourself.

You can absolutely use 100% beef with this recipe (and I have many, many times–I especially like to use 100% grass-fed and -finished ground beef, if possible) or 50/50 ground meat and pork. If you are not sure what to use, experiment and see what you like! Each type of meat contributes its own nuanced flavors to the meatballs.

Regardless of the exact blend of meats used, try not to use a very lean meat, if possible, for the juiciest meatballs. Fat equals flavor and moisture, and it is really important with this dish! I use either a 80/20 or 85/15 (lean/fat) ratio, based on what is available. This ratio used in the recipe below will create the most flavorful and balanced, juicy and tender meatballs!

If you prefer an alternative ground meat, check out my Easy Baked Turkey Meatballs recipe.

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl.

Fried vs. Baked vs. Cooked in the Sauce?

All of these methods of cooking meatballs have their benefits and all will produce a slightly different result. Here, I have focused on pan-frying the meatballs in a skillet on the stovetop (my favorite meatball cooking technique) which creates a crispy, caramelized exterior while maintaining a juicy interior. Sometimes I cook the meatballs 100% in the pan and sometimes, I simply brown them in the pan and finish cooking them in a large pot of tomato sauce. It really just depends on when I plan on serving the meatballs and if I am making sauce at the same time. More often than not lately, I cook a double batch of meatballs–some for the same day and many more to freeze as meal prep.

But when I have a lot of meatballs to make (when prepping for an upcoming party, for example), I may bake them as they take less time and are a bit more streamlined. They also don’t need the oil used when frying. (I include instructions for baking meatballs in the recipe below or you can follow my Baked Italian Meatball recipe here.)

And, many people swear by cooking raw meatballs directly in a pot of simmering sauce, claiming the meatballs are much more tender, soft and juicy than frying or baking. I personally have never done this, but I imagine that it would create a beautifully rich, meaty-tasting sugo as it becomes fortified with all the braised meat juices and fat. (The closest I have gotten to this is when I carefully cook raw mini-meatballs in simmering broth in my Wedding Soup recipe, creating a rich and flavorful soup with unmatched flavors.)

The meatball recipe below can be cooked using any of these techniques.

Tips for Making Meatballs in Advance

Meatballs are the ultimate make in advance food! Cook them, then freeze them in either an airtight container or freezer bag for at least three months, with or without sauce, for an easy weeknight or last-minute meal, like this delicious meatball parm hero.

I generally freeze meatballs without sauce. When I’m ready to serve them, I will add the frozen meatballs to a lightly simmering sauce and let them defrost easily right in the pot. It works every time!

You can refrigerate cooked meatballs for at least five days, making them a nice option for parties and get togethers.

You can also freeze raw, formed meatballs. This requires the additional step of flash freezing the balls on a sheet pan until firm. Then, group them together in a container or freezer bag and return them to the freezer for up to three months. When ready to cook the meatballs, either bake them right from frozen state or defrost them fully and fry them in a skillet as per the recipe below.

And, finally, the raw meatball mixture can be held in the refrigerator (either in bulk or in formed balls) for up to one day before cooking.

There are so many great reasons to love this Fried Meatball recipe! It’s a proven crowd pleaser, makes tasty, juicy and incredibly flavorful meatballs every time, has the best texture, can be tailored to your preferred blend of meats and was made for meal prep. I hope that this will become one of your favorite meatball recipes!

Fried meatballs sprinkled with coarse sea salt.

Ingredients for Fried Meatballs

⁠⁠With relatively few ingredients in these pan fried Italian meatballs, the quality of each item is very important. We’ll need:

  • Ground Meat (Beef/Pork/Veal): Or whichever blend you like! (See above for lots more on this topic.) Whichever blend of meats you choose, be sure not to use a very lean meat, if possible, for the juiciest meatballs. Fat equals flavor and moisture and it is really important with this dish! I use either a 80/20 or 85/15 (lean/fat) ratio, based on what is available. This ratio used in the recipe below will create the most flavorful and balanced, juicy and tender meatballs!
  • Bread: I love using day-old bread that is hand torn or diced then soaked in milk/eggs in my meatball mixture because it contributes to a light meatball. The bread is both a binder for the meatball mixture and is also there to absorb the juices from the meat as it cooks, keeping all that flavorful goodness inside. And, quantity is important here–too much and your meatballs will become a bit heavy and tough. While bread crumbs can be used in a pinch, diced bread is really the best option for a lighter meatball with great texture. If you are using breadcrumbs, the amount is different. (See recipe below for details.)
  • Whole Milk: I use whole milk to moisten the bread and add overall moisture to the meatballs. (Many people think it’s the eggs that add moisture, but their role is different. Keep reading . . .)
  • Eggs: The role of eggs in meatballs is very important! They are there to bind the meat, bread and other ingredients together so that they do not fall apart or become too flimsy during the cooking process.
  • Onions and Garlic: Add flavor and texture! Be sure to use fresh garlic and finely chop both the onions and garlic. And, please, do not use pre-minced garlic! It has a strange flavor that is unpleasant.
  • Pecorino Romano Cheese: The sharpness and saltiness of this sheep’s milk cheese is an important flavor in this recipe. Grated and not shredded cheese should be used and freshly grated yourself is always preferred, if possible. You can substitute half of the pecorino with parmesan cheese if you would like. (I often do this.)
  • Fresh Basil and Parsley: While some may think fresh herbs are overkill in a meatball recipe, it’s these special touches that make a great meatball. They do make a difference! Having said this, if you need to use dried, you can. See the Recipe Notes for amounts.
  • Oil: Use either a pure or virgin olive oil or a neutral oil with a high smoke point, such as avocado oil or a vegetable oil, for the pan-frying. You can certainly use extra-virgin olive oil for the frying, but it is not necessary.
Ingredients for fried meatballs.

Check out one of my best “Insider Tips” for making the best meatballs here, as featured in Appetito’s online Italian Food and Drink Magazine.

How to Make Fried Meatballs, with Pro-Tips!

Here are the main steps for how to make fried meatballs with beef pork and veal:

  • Gather and prep all ingredients.

  • Then, whisk the eggs and milk together in a large bowl.
Prepped ingredients for pan fried meatballs.
Whisking eggs and milk together with other ingredients in background.
  • Immerse the bread in the egg/milk mixture and let it sit for about 5 minutes to allow the bread hydrate.

  • Mix in the cheese, onions, fresh herbs, garlic, salt and black pepper, and stir well.

Cubed bread added to milk egg mixture.
Grated cheese, parsley, onion, garlic and other ingredients added to bread egg milk mixture.
  • Gently combine the bread mixture with the ground meat and mix lightly but thoroughly. Be careful not to over-mix as doing so may result in tough meatballs. Let this mixture sit for about 15 minutes.
    • PRO-TIP: It’s really important not to overwork the ground meat, as it could then toughen up. So, mix all non-ground meat ingredients together in a separate bowl until well-incorporated and then fold this mixture gently into the ground meat. Mixing is still involved, of course, but much less with this technique as opposed to if all of the ingredients were added and mixed together at the same time.
    • PRO-TIP: Make this meatball mixture one day in advance and store it overnight in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap.
    • PRO-TIP: Always pan-fry a small amount of the meatball mixture and taste test to check seasonings and texture before portioning the whole batch. Adjust seasonings if necessary.
Bread mixture added to ground meat mixture.
Final meatball mixture.
  • Using a portion scoop or measuring cup, portion mixture into approximately 2 to 3-ounce portions, about a ¼ cup each (or whatever size you like) and roll them into round balls.
    • PRO-TIP: Wet your hands a little to make rolling easier.

Using a portioning scoop to portion and form meatballs.
Sheet pan full of portioned meatballs next to pan with oil, ready to fry.
  • Add enough oil to a large, non-stick skillet to cover the bottom of the pan by about ¼-½”. Heat the oil over medium heat until bubbles form around the tip of a wooden spoon inserted in the oil.
    • PRO-TIP: Be sure to use either a non-stick pan or a seasoned cast iron skillet for the best results. Otherwise, the meatballs may stick to the pan and you will be miserable.
    • PRO-TIP: If the meatball is placed in the pan before the oil is hot enough, it will absorb too much oil, become soggy and possible fall apart.

  • Then, gently transfer the raw meatballs to the hot oil. Do not overcrowd the pan! Brown multiple sides of the meatballs until cooked through (until an internal temperature of 165˚F is reached).
Meatballs frying in oil in stainless steel pan.
Finished fried meatballs on a cooling rack.
  • Transfer the cooked meatballs to either a rack over a sheet pan or a paper towel-lined plate (to drain excess oil) or directly to a pot of sauce.. That’s it!
    • PRO-TIP: If you are transferring the browned meatballs directly to a pot of sauce, you don’t need to fully cook them as they will finish cooking in the simmering sauce.
    • PRO-TIP: Don’t forget to enjoy one or two hot out of the pan plain with some salt!
    • PRO-TIP: Double the recipe and freeze half for another time. The meatballs freeze beautifully for up to 3 months.
Plate full of fried meatballs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I bake these polpette di carne instead of frying them?

Definitely, and I often bake these meatballs if I am making a large amount.
 
To bake instead of pan frying these meatballs, preheat oven to 425˚F and arrange a rack in the center of the oven. Place meatballs on a parchment-lined sheet pan at least ½” apart from each other. (Tip: If you’d like a browner meatball, lightly spray the tops of the raw meatballs with oil before placing the sheet pan in the oven.)  Put the sheet pan in the oven and roast the meatballs for about 20 minutes, depending on size. Rotate the sheet pan once about halfway through the cooking process.
 
The meatballs are finished cooking when they have reached an internal temperature of 165˚F. Use a stem thermometer to test the internal temperature.

How can you tell when fried meatballs are finished cooking?

Fully cooked meatballs will have no pink inside and the juices should run clear. Use a stem thermometer for a foolproof way to determine if the meatballs are done cooking. The meatballs are finished cooking when they have reached an internal temperature of 165˚F. (After frying one or two meatballs, you will become an expert and know when they are done without the thermometer!)

How can I keep meatballs from sticking to the pan?

Be sure to use either a non-stick pan or a seasoned cast iron skillet for the best results. Otherwise, the meatballs may stick to the pan and you will be miserable. Note that if you cook the meatballs in batches, you may need to add additional oil to the pan during the cooking process as it gets absorbed.

Why are my meatballs tough?

Tough or heavy meatballs can be a result of using too many breadcrumbs, overworking the meatball mixture or overcooking the meatballs. To avoid this, use bread instead of breadcrumbs, mix all non-ground meat ingredients together in a separate bowl until well-incorporated and then fold this mixture gently into the ground meat, and pay close attention during the cooking phase. Take the temperature of the meatballs about 2/3 of the way through cooking to closely monitor their progress.

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl with basil garnish.
How do I keep the Italian fried meatballs from falling apart?

Using the proper ratio of eggs to breadcrumbs and other ingredients should ensure your meatballs do not fall apart. The recipe below is fully tested, so just follow it and you should have firm, but not tough, meatballs.

How do you fry meatballs so they stay round?

If you fry meatballs in a pan or bake them on a sheet pan, they will never be perfectly round and will always have some flat sides. (Interestingly enough, my Abruzzese grandmother made large, football-shaped meatballs. But, I digress.)

The best way to keep meatballs as round as possible would be to make deep fried meatballs or simmer them gently in a pot of sauce.
 
Having said this, there are a couple of things you can do to keep these pan-fried meatballs as round as possible. First, completely chill the ground meat mixture in the refrigerator before portioning it into balls. This firms up the meat a bit so that the balls hold their shape better. Secondly, don’t let the raw, rolled meatballs sit for long at room temperature or they’ll become flat on the side they’re sitting. Finally, fry in hot oil and rotate them carefully to stay round and brown evenly.

Can I prepare the (raw) meatball mixture in advance?

Yes, the raw meatball mixture can be held in the refrigerator (either in bulk or in formed balls) for up to one day before cooking. Just cover it/them tightly with plastic wrap.
 
You can also refrigerate cooked meatballs for at least five days, making them a nice option for parties and get togethers.

Can I freeze these beef pork and veal meatballs?

Absolutely! In fact, I almost always double (at least) this recipe when I make it. This way, I have some meatballs immediately and then lots of meatballs for the future. Just place the meatballs in a freezer bag or container once cooked and cooled, and they will hold for up to three months in the freezer. It’s a great way to have homemade meatballs ready in a pinch!
 
I generally freeze meatballs without sauce. When I’m ready to serve them, I will add the frozen meatballs to a lightly simmering sauce and let them defrost easily right in the pot. It works every time!
 
You can also freeze raw, formed meatballs. This requires the additional step of flash freezing the balls on a sheet pan until firm. Then, group them together in a container or freezer bag and return them to the freezer for up to three months. When ready to cook the meatballs, either bake them right from frozen state or defrost them fully and fry them in a skillet as per the recipe below.

Can I use breadcrumbs instead of bread?

Yes. While you can use breadcrumbs in a pinch, diced bread is really the best option for a lighter meatball with great texture. If you are using breadcrumbs, start with 1 cup plain breadcrumbs (for the recipe below) and add more (up to 1¼ cups) if the mixture is too wet.

What is the best type of oil to use for frying meatballs?

Use either a pure or virgin olive oil or a neutral oil with a high smoke point, such as avocado or vegetable oil, for the pan-frying. You can certainly use extra-virgin olive oil for the frying, but it is not necessary.

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl with basil garnish.

I love eating these meatballs with a big bowl of Pasta with Pesto, Pasta with Broccoli or Spaghetti Aglio e Olio!

Serving Suggestions for Fried Meatballs

I’m not sure that any of us need any tips on how to what to serve with Italian meatballs–it is sort of an innate knowledge!

Having said this, the serving possibilities are endless! Here are a few of my favorites:

This fried meatballs recipe also makes a great party appetizer in a smaller portion. (A two tablespoon portion works well.) Arrange them on a platter with toothpicks and some sauces to dip in.

Pan fried meatballs in tomato sauce with basil garnish over a bed of creamy ricotta cheese.

Recipe Variations and Substitutions for Fried Meatballs

Here are a few great suggestions for twists and additions to this easy homemade Italian meatball recipe:

  • Use a Different Meat Combination: You can switch out the ground beef/pork/veal mixture for another–all beef, 50/50 beef and pork, etc.
  • Make them Gluten Free: Easily make this recipe gluten-free by substituting the bread amount with 1 cup of either gluten-free rolled, old-fashioned, or quick-cooking oats. Find my gluten free Italian meatball recipe made with oats here.
  • Bake the Meatballs: To cut down on the oil, bake the meatballs. Full details in the recipe below.
  • Stuff the Meatballs with Cheese! For something a bit richer and more decadent, try stuffing the meatballs with a bit of fresh mozzarella. Just poke a hole in each rounded ball, fill it with a small piece of cheese, close up the whole and continue with the recipe. Stuffed meatballs will take longer to cook than un-stuffed meatballs, fyi.
  • Add Heat: Add ½ teaspoon (or more) red pepper flakes into the meatball mix for some picante!

More Great Recipes to Try

I hope that you are enjoying my Italian food blog Mangia With Michele and all of my Italian recipes and Italian-American recipes!

If you’ve tried these Italian Fried Meatballs or any other recipe on the blog, please let me know how it went in the comments below — I love hearing from you!

You can also FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK and INSTAGRAM to see more delicious food and what might be going on behind the scenes!

Fried meatballs in marinara sauce in white bowl with basil garnish.

Easy Italian Pan Fried Meatballs (Beef Pork Veal)

Michele
Italian Pan Fried Meatballs are moist, tender and so flavorful from a ground beef, pork and veal combination, sharp Pecorino cheese, fresh herbs and just the right blend of aromatics, hand-torn bread and love! Seriously, though, this recipe is foolproof, easy to make, and creates beautiful aromas throughout your kitchen as the meatballs are quickly pan fried in a skillet on the stovetop.
5 from 11 votes
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Course Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine Italian
Servings 8 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 4 large eggs, beaten
  • ½ cup whole milk
  • 2 heaping cups torn or diced day-old bread (loosely packed)
  • 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • ½ cup finely chopped yellow onion (about 1 large onion)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil leaves
  • ¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 2 pounds ground meat (equal parts beef/veal/pork–See Note.)
  • Oil, for frying

Instructions
 

  • Prep all ingredients according to specifications above.
    (Please see the section above in the blog post for Step-By-Step instructions with photos.)
  • Whisk the eggs and milk together in a large bowl.
    4 large eggs,, ½ cup whole milk
  • Then, immerse the bread in the egg/milk mixture (make sure it is fully immersed) and let it sit for about 5 minutes to allow the bread hydrate.
    2 heaping cups torn or diced day-old bread
  • Mix in the cheese, onions, fresh herbs, garlic, salt and black pepper, and stir well.
    1 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese, ½ cup finely chopped yellow onion, ¼ cup chopped fresh basil leaves, ¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley, 1 Tbsp minced garlic, 2 tsp salt, 1 tsp black pepper
  • Gently combine the bread mixture with the ground meat and mix lightly until all ingredients are well-combined. Be careful not to over-mix as doing so may result in tough meatballs. Let this mixture sit for about 15 minutes. It can also be made one day in advance and sit overnight in the refrigerator, covered with plastic wrap.
    2 pounds ground meat
  • Always pan-fry a small amount of the meatball mixture and taste test to check seasonings and texture before portioning the whole batch. Adjust seasonings if necessary.
  • Using a portion scoop or measuring cup, portion mixture into approximately 2-3-ounce portions, about a ¼ cup each (or whatever size you like), and roll them into round balls. (Tip: Wet your hands a little to make rolling easier.)
  • Add enough oil to a large, non-stick skillet to cover the bottom of the pan by about ¼-½”. Heat the oil over medium heat until bubbles form around the tip of a wooden spoon inserted in the oil.
  • Then, gently transfer the raw meatballs to the hot oil. Do not overcrowd the pan! Brown multiple sides of the meatballs until cooked through (until an internal temperature of 165˚F is reached). (After making one or two meatballs, you will know when they are done without testing them.) This will take about 6 to 10 minutes per meatball, depending on the size.
  • Then, transfer them to either a rack over a sheet pan or a paper towel-lined plate (to drain excess oil) or directly to a pot of sauce. Don’t forget to enjoy one or two hot out of the pan plain with some salt!
  • Alternatively, you can brown the meatballs and let them finish cooking in the sauce. Depending on how many I am making and if I am serving them on the same day, I will do this. But, more often than not, I make a double batch of these meatballs, fry them, cool them, then store them in a freezer bag in the freezer so that I have meatballs whenever I want! They freeze beautifully.
  • The serving possibilities are numerous! See Serving Suggestions above for more about this. Buon Appetito!

Notes

  • In this recipe, I use a traditional ground beef, pork and veal blend (equal amounts of each) and it creates a rich and uniquely-flavored meatball. But, you can absolutely use 100% beef with this recipe or 50/50 ground meat and pork. If you are not sure what to use, experiment and see what you like! Each type of meat contributes its own unique flavors to the meatballs.
  • Regardless of the exact blend of meats used, try not to use a very lean meat, if possible, for the juiciest meatballs. Fat equals flavor and moisture and it is really important with this dish! I use either a 80/20  or 85/15 (lean/fat) ratio, based on what is available. This ratio used in the recipe below will create the most flavorful and balanced, juicy and tender meatballs!
  • While breadcrumbs can be used in a pinch, diced bread is really the best option for a lighter meatball with great texture. If you are using breadcrumbs, start with 1 cup plain breadcrumbs and add more (up to 1¼ cups) if the mixture is too wet.
  • Use either a pure (not extra-virgin) olive oil or a neutral oil with a high smoke point, such as avocado oil, for the pan-frying.
  • Be sure to use either a non-stick pan or a seasoned cast iron skillet for the best results. Otherwise, the meatballs may stick to the pan and you will be miserable. Note that if you cook the meatballs in batches, you may need to add additional oil to the pan during the cooking process as it gets absorbed.
  • If the meatball is placed in the pan before the oil is hot enough, it will absorb too much oil, become soggy and possible fall apart.
  • If you are transferring the browned meatballs directly to a pot of sauce, you don’t need to fully cook them as they will finish cooking in the simmering sauce.
  • This recipe makes 25 to 30 (¼ cup uncooked portion) meatballs. Make the meatballs any size or shape that you want! The yield will change, however.
  • If you don’t have fresh herbs, you can use 1 Tbsp each dried basil and parsley as a substitute.
  • To bake instead of pan frying these meatballs, preheat oven to 425˚F and arrange a rack in the center of the oven. Place meatballs on a parchment-lined sheet pan at least ½” apart from each other. (Tip: If you’d like a browner meatball, lightly spray the tops of the raw meatballs with oil before placing the sheet pan in the oven.)  Put the sheet pan in the oven and roast the meatballs for about 20 minutes, depending on size. Rotate the sheet pan once about halfway through the cooking process. The meatballs are finished cooking when they have reached an internal temperature of 165˚F. Use a stem thermometer to test the internal temperature.
  • To store, cool meatballs completely, then refrigerate the meatballs in an airtight container for up to 5 days or freeze them in a freezer container or bag for up to 3 months. The meatballs do not need to be completely thawed before reheating.
 
Recipe by Mangia With Michele. Please visit my site for more great cooking inspiration!
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15 thoughts on “Easy Italian Pan Fried Meatballs (Beef Pork Veal)

  1. 5 stars
    First time making these.
    They were delicious, thank you!!

  2. 5 stars
    Absolutely amazing! Best meatballs ever and I’ve made and eaten plenty! Delicious, flavorful and easy to make.

  3. What type of bread do you use? Italian bread from a bakery or sandwich bread?

    1. Hi Vicki! I prefer to use Italian bread from a bakery. Thanks for your question and enjoy the recipe.

  4. 5 stars
    This, along with your amazing sauce recipe to go with it were a major hit at my wife Sonia’s Italian themed birthday party! I think it even upstaged the wine tasting we had at the party! Did I mention your amazing Garlic bread recipe?!?

    1. I’m so glad that you and your guests enjoyed all the recipes, Patrick! Thanks for your comment. 🙂

  5. 5 stars
    Just made these over the weekend. Used all beef this time since what I had. And dried basil and fresh parsley. Italian bread with crust just like the photo. Baked not fried. Tender & flavorful!!
    Thank you Michele!!

  6. I have never put onions in my meatballs is there a part of Italy that does that,my parents were from Sicily ,just wondering. I thought I would try it once and my mother said what are you doing,are you making meatballs or meatloaf. So needless to say I left out the onions.☺️

    1. Hi Camille, I’m not sure which parts of Italy use onions in their meatballs, if any. This is not meant to be an authentic, regional Italian meatball recipe, but rather an Italian-American recipe based on the meatballs that my mom, grandmom and aunts made growing up.

    2. I did a little research on this a while back and my results were predictable. My “take away” is this. Make them the way you like them. Trying to find out the “authentic” or “original” way is futile. Most Italians think that the way their Mama or Nana made them is the ONLY way and if you don’t make them that way they are not true Italian meatballs. HOGWASH!! Regional? Nonesense. People in Italy argue with the person across the street (literally) about how to prepare food so, just make them your way.

      1. For sure. I always encourage making recipes your own and adapting them to your own personal taste.

        1. 5 stars
          I accidentally commented about these glorious meatballs under the Suco recipe. These are the most flavorful meatballs and perfect texture. my new go-to recipe!

  7. 5 stars
    What a great recipe! Bread cubes instead of bread crumbs – who knew! What a difference in texture!! I baked instead of frying – 15 minutes plenty cuz I made them a little smaller. Leftovers are going to be Super Bowl snacks with a bowl of sauce for dipping! Love the pro tips & the repeat of the ingredients in the instructions steps – so helpful!
    Thanks again to Michele!!

  8. 5 stars
    I love this!! And I’m lucky you made it for me recently – walking in your house to a big hug and these meatballs was really soothing to the soul! And delicious. ❤️

  9. 5 stars
    LOVE this recipe! Very easy to follow and great tips. The best meatballs I’ve ever had! (and I have has a lot)

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